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Suite 203

Sandy Utah 84070

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Jeffrey C. Jensen (J.C.)

ASSOCIATE

Prior to joining Nelson Jones in August of 2016, J.C. enjoyed extensive careers as a Paramedic and Law Enforcement Officer. Although the practice of law is J.C.’s primary focus, he still finds time to maintain and work as a Nationally Registered Paramedic, Utah certified Paramedic, and Nevada Licensed Flight Paramedic. Additionally, he maintains and works as a certified Utah Law Enforcement Officer where he has served in the capacities of Deputy Sheriff/Paramedic, SWAT Operator, Breacher, Scout, and Sniper, Adjunct Instructor, and where he currently works as a Patrol Officer. J.C. brought to Nelson Jones an in-depth understanding of the law enforcement dynamic, a prominent rapport with Law Enforcement Officers and their administration throughout the state, as well as first-hand experience of the complexities related to divorce. J.C. specializes in the administrative and criminal representation of Law Enforcement Officers as well as family law

related matters.

 

BAR ADMISSIONS

Utah, number 16073

 

EXPERIENCE

Clerked for Presiding Judge Paul B. Parker at the Salt Lake County, Third District Court.

Salt Lake Legal Defenders Office, September 2015 – May 2016.

Skordas, Caston, & Hyde, September 2014 – September 2016.

Nelson Jones, PLLC September 2016 - Present

 

REPRESENTATIVE CASES

 

Palmer v. St. George City Council, St. George Police Department, Et Al., 2018 UT App 94. Synopsis: a police sergeant was suspended for 40 hours without pay for allegedly violating agency policy. The sergeant challenged the suspension and asked that the city provide access to records that would show whether the punishment imposed was proportional and consistent with discipline handed down other employees. The city denied this request. Held: municipal agencies cannot deny employees access to comparative discipline files necessary to challenge disciplinary decisions before appeals boards. Further, the Appeals Board violated the employee’s due process rights by failing to make factual findings that would explain its decision. Outcome: the employee’s suspension was set aside and the case was remanded for a new appeals hearing.

 

Spanish Fork City v. Jerritt Simons.

Synopsis: a police officer, was charged with one count of Assault. Following a jury trial, the officer was acquitted of the charge.

 

Murray City Corporation v. Daniel S. Hilton.

Synopsis: a corrections officer was charged with one count of Assault (Domestic Violence). Following a jury trial, the officer was acquitted of the charge.

 

State of Utah v. Edward Robert Smith.

Synopsis: a police officer was charged with one count of Burglary of a Vehicle and one count of Theft. Following a preliminary hearing and with information gleaned from that hearing, a Motion to Dismiss was filed and agreed with by the State, resulting in the Court ordering counts one and two be dismissed with prejudice.

 

State of Utah v. Nathan Arnold Jacobsen.

Synopsis: an officer was charged with one count of Violation of a Protective Order. At the preliminary hearing, bind over was denied.

 

In the Matter of the Certification of Candace Tschogl.

Synopsis: a Department of Natural Resources officer was investigated by Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) for a violation of Utah Code 53-6-211 where POST recommended a 3 and ½ hear suspension of the officer’s Peace Officer Certification. Following engagement with POST Council, the suspension was decreased to three months.